Posts Tagged ‘eBooks’

Review: BLOWBACK, an espionage thriller

Monday, September 30th, 2013

BLOWBACK <><><><>

An exciting new espionage thriller, with insider detail and the realism that only a former spy could provide, by former CIA ops officer Valerie Plame Wilson and thriller writer Sarah Lovett.

Covert CIA ops officer Vanessa Pierson pits herself against Bhoot, alias The Ghost, the world’s most dangerous international nuclear arms dealer. The fast-paced action takes the reader from Europe to Washington D.C. to the Near East.

Be inside the head of a CIA ops officer, a heroine to admire—courage, stamina, intelligence, determination—as she risks her cover, her career and her life to hunt for and take down not only arms dealer Bhoot, but also another man, a talented elusive assassin who kills a highly valued contact.

The non-stop suspense, action, and intrigue will likely have readers wanting to finish the novel in one sitting, while the emotional connections between characters, including a forbidden love affair with handsome as hell David Khoury, give the story and characters depth, and a sense of real community in a dangerous profession. An exceptional thriller, and a great read!! I can’t wait until their next book.

This is the first installment of the Vanessa Pierson series.
________________________________________________

Valerie Plame Wilson also wrote Fair Game: How a Top CIA Agent was Betrayed by Her Own Government (with Laura Rozen). Her career in the CIA included assignments in Counterproliferation operations, ensuring that enemies of the United States could not threaten the country with weapons of mass destruction.

Sarah Lovett’s five suspense novels–Dark Alchemy, Dantes’ Inferno, Acquired Motives, Dangerous Attachments, and A Desperate Silence—feature forensic psychologist Dr. Sylvia Strange, and have been published in the United States and around the world.
________________________________________________

Blue Rider Press / A member of the Penguin Group (USA) Inc. / New York.
________________________________________________

Link to Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Blowback-Vanessa-Pierson-Novel-Valerie/dp/0399158200/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1380595871&sr=1-1&keywords=blowback+by+valerie+plame

 

How is your Publishing sonar? Or Size matters?

Saturday, November 24th, 2012

Publishing and the future. Change is, of course the key word here. We’ve been seeing change, but not much of a response from the big 6 publishers.

Now some of the big publishers are merging or considering a merger–Random House & Penguin and possibly now Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins. One wonders if this is the best direction for them to go, but it certainly makes sense to want to combine resources to survive.  I enjoyed the November 3rd article on TechCrunch.com, the “Quick, Tie the Rafts Together” by Devin Coldewey (the link is here:  http://techcrunch.com/2012/11/03/quick-tie-the-rafts-together/ ) where he discusses the Random House/Penguin merger.

But with so many authors self-publishing and thus becoming entities that are both more nimble and faster in the new market–publishing in 2 months, thru ebooks, rather than in 2 years, thru print–I have to question this trend with publishers to want to go bigger. Normally, in the past, this would be the way to go in any industry that faces such change–to find ways to strengthen your company and maybe diversify a little.

It’s great that they’re finally really perceiving the need for change. As best-selling author and Cool Gus Publishing’s copublisher Bob Mayer said, back in April 2011 (and actually before that), the big publishers response to the epublishing trend was basically to rearrange the deck chairs on the Titanic–mostly they have been just protecting their turf (see his Write It Forward blog post, “I Don’t Know; I’m Guessing; I Know–the future of publishing for authors”). And in the industry itself, the rearranging has been in the percentage of books that are Indie vs Traditionally published, ebook vs print. Personally I like the combination–ebooks & print–and see the necessity for a combination of them in our society, but that’s another story.

I’ll take the analogy of the Titanic just a little further. The Titanic itself was so huge that it could not be turned in time to avoid that collision with the iceberg. And it didn’t help that it was also going too fast for the dangerous terrain.

So, while it’s good that these publishing houses are no longer just rearranging the deck chairs, are they becoming like the big ship itself? That is, a ship that’s too big to navigate through today’s uncertain waters, where the normal sonar may not register the shifting undercurrents and icebergs of change..or at least signal that a change of course could be needed quickly to avoid a disaster. And about the number of lifeboats…

As an aside, our government is facing the same issue. In the form of the Fiscal Cliff. Can we change course in time to avoid disaster? Congress seems to have its head in the sand.

On one final note, in the movie TITANIC directed by James Cameron, in the scene where most of the major characters are gathered around a table discussing the building of the huge ship, the heroine makes the comment about Freud’s theory on the male preoccupation with size. (In the context, it was funny.)

But it’s also interesting to note that one of the causes of the Titanic disaster was that the ship’s rudder…was built too small. A little irony.

In this case, maybe smaller would be better. The raft…

 

Your eBook Public Library

Friday, June 1st, 2012

If you haven’t tried the ebooks at your local library, it’s a marvelous option. And you don’t have to have a Kindle or a Nook to take advantage of it. Keep reading…

Here’s a trip through one online ebook system at a local library.

First, you don’t have to log in to scan the books they offer.

The link to the ebooks is on the Home page and once you log in–of course, you do have to have a library card–then the first page you will see offers the following  list of options.

My Cart
Lending Period
My Bookshelf
My Holds
Wish List
Rated Titles: titles you have rated and allows you to change ratings.
 

The basic rules are that you can check out 5 ebooks at a time, and have 5 ebook holds at a time. Any number of ebooks may be added to the Wish List–as you might assume. Ebooks may be checked out for 21 days, and when due, they just disappear from your device or computer. When ebooks placed on hold become available, the system emails you and then you have 5 days to check them out.  The formats available are Kindle and ePub & epub/PDF, and from 1 to 6 of each title is available for check out–for each title, the screen shows how many copies are available and how many total library copies there are. If you don’t have a Nook or a Kindle for reading ebooks, there is  also Adobe Digital Editions for use on your PC, as well as Apps for reading on Mobile devices–all available for download, right there.

Beginning on the browsing pages, there are several windows: fiction, nonfiction and teen/kids sections. There are also sections to browse, such as:

New ebook Additions
Most Popular
Suggested Titles
Recently Returned
All Subjects
All ebooks 

For the almost 3,000 titles of fiction, the categories are Classical Literature, Historical Fiction, Literature, Mystery & Suspense, Romance, Sci Fi & Fantasy, and View All Fiction. 

The categories for the approximately 1,000 nonfiction titles are Bio & Autobio, Cooking & Food, Health & Wellness, History, Humor, Family & Relationships, Religion & Spirituality, Self-Improvement, and Travel.  For Kids, there are about 250 titles; for teens, about 100 titles.

Once you have your titles in My Cart, you have 30 minutes to check them out. Checking them out requires that you log in to your Amazon account, where they will be available for download to your account and then to your ereading device.  The books you have checked out will then be listed in the My BookShelf of your ebook library account.

Some of the fiction authors available on the system include:

Lisa Jackson, James Patterson, Janet Evanovitch, Heather Graham, Karen Robards, George R.R. Martin, Danielle Steel, Terry Brooks, Nicholas Sparks, John Grisham, Anne Perry, Nora Roberts, Alexander McCall Smith, Tami Hoag, Barbara Freethy, Rita Mae Brown, Toni Morrison, John Case, James Lee Burke, Ted Dexter, Tess Gerritson, Lisa Unger, Suzanne Brockmann, Robert Crais, Lee Child, Iris Johansen, Linda Howard, and Michael Connelly, Jonathan Kellerman, Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, D.H. Lawrence, Agatha Christie, Susan Mallery,  Fern Michaels, and so on….

So, what’s on your wish list?